Seriously...

Reviews For Seriously...

Telling people who are difficult to understand to keep being difficult to understand because they have the right to sound like themselves? Seriously? You don’t dress the same way at home and at work, so what’s wrong with speaking professionally at work? Then in the episode about Biden vs Trump, just interviewing people fired by a Trump. Seriously? I’m beginning to understand the title. Biden has a history of lying which is why he has two failed presidential bids under his belt. No mention of that. When I first started listening a few years ago it was alright. Recently it’s all garbage.
Wide ranging and diverse topics covered by knowledgeable sources and brilliant reporting. Another great show from the BBC!
This account of the "purity spiral" is a seductive subterfuge. Two plausible stories of people going to far is linked to some right wing "philosophy." It does not say so clearly, but it cleverly leads the reader or listener to accept the "purity spiral" as a problem created by women, critical race theory, LBGTQ folk. The sources cited are all "right wing", but "purity spiral" comes more from these theories that from the left. The phenomenon is more common on the right than the left. Check the sources Gavin Haynes mentions to see for your self. Douglas Murray "The Madness of Crowds" I expect better of the BBC.
In general, a surprising podcast with great, diverse material. There are only two weaknesses to the program: (1) The host--who never speaks for more than 45 seconds--is infuriatingly banal. Don't let her ruin the podcast for you. (2) Some episodes are bad. They are few and you know them right away when you see the title. If the episode has anything to do with social media, futurism, or technology, it will be banal Twitter-level discourse, voiced by a brain-dead tech-triumphalist spouting tired bromides. These two things said, this is an almost consistently excellent podcast, notwithstanding the soul-crushing stupidity of the host and the occasional contributor.
Interesting, engaging subjects covered and presented for the curious. An excellent break from the rest of the day’s weight.
I seriously cannot believe that professional journalists have such serious lisps and speech defects. Where were the speech pathologists when these people were children. I’m traumatized for them. It reminds me of the NPR situation. This is the BBC, for Christ’s sake. Also, vocal fry as a bonus.
Loved every minute of it.
The summaries/reactions from the host at the end of each episode don’t do much for me, being a little lightweight by comparison, but the shows themselves are solid gold! Really tremendous, curated content.
Love this. Great thought, provocative and in depth. Can’t bear Rihanna’s personal perspective at the end though! Otherwise great.
Do not be put off this terrific podcast--documentaries, etc., from BBC Radio 4--by the irritating introduction and end-summaries and the even more irritating podcast host. The latest--Peter Tatchell on decriminalising male homosexuality in the UK--was an eye-opening and thorough analysis that should make anyone who cares about civil rights both better-informed and angry. The host, when it finished, described it as "an engaging listen"--a phrase that manages to be simultaneously meaningless and semi-literate.
I used to love this podcast. This latest rebranding makes me decidedly less excited to listen. The content is still excellent, but the introduction seems odd to me, and the intro music grates SERIOUSLY on my nerves. I try to skip the first 15 seconds or so each time, but since it starts immediately they're already grated. I'd love to have a second or so of silence at the beginning to allow me to skip without grating first, or at least an option to start 15 seconds into the podcast! As is, I'm afraid it's only a matter of time before I wear down and stop listening.
Wonderful.
Excited to hear more
I just found the Doc of the Week podcast less than two months ago. Already it's given me some truly unique little audio experiences, which I might have otherwise missed. From a history of the Smiley Face icon to a discussion of the more militant of the British "suffragettes" (with some archived interviews with the women involved), it is definitely worth seeking out.